click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
this year we were overjoyed. what's more, i think the bigger objective in working for green energy whether it's government funding or private funded is to lead the way to showing people that green energy is for everybody and we don't need to wait on big energy companies and so forth to give us top down energy that this renewable energy technology gives us the capacity and it's going take initiatives like this po to popular i was this idea. i would like you to put this into effect as quickly as possible. >> thank you. next speakers. christian swin, gabby, jennifer fong. >> thank you, good afternoon. my name is ivy slagel. a san francisco resident since 1996. i represent residents. in my work with premium peace i work with folks across the country who are eagerly waiting for -- people want affordable clean energy and want their jobs and recovered. two stories i want to share with you. when voters approved, within 6 months they had a contract of 100 percent savings cost of $133 to $150 a year including natural gas. that was a savings to consumers within 6 months and the bid effectively dumpe
hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead
part we do in terms of purchasing energy. i don't believe that legally there is an authority to decouple the build out from the purchases agreement with shell and in fact i think if that is the approach, i don't believe that there is legal authority for the puc or anyone to do that because the expectation and the intent when the board approved the purchase agreement was there would be a robust build out concurrent with the purchase agreement. i know that sflafco has never approved, the board of supervisors has never approved decoupling of the two. i don't know what decouple means, but as we go forward with the shell contract agreement, we'll be continuing to do a build out as robust a build out as we possibly can. the word decoupling does not, i think, describe what the board of supervisors and what this commission have approved. >> thank you commissioner campos. i would concur. >> commissioner veet or? >> i would also concur. i believe the commissions and i'm not sure the general manager we have decoupling word has been put out there at a couple of our public meetings as we
. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of photo volume takes. >> we have over 600 solar panels and three platforms on the building, and four integrated wind turbines. the wind turbines and the solar panels produce 7% of the building's energy. and we're reducing the use of energy here by 32% in the office building. >> the entire building is controlled by a complex computer system which monitors and adjusts air, heating and lights as well as indoor shades. >> the building is going to be a smart building. it's going to have all integrated features. so, it has a monitor on the roof that knows where the sun is. as it gets warmer or colder, it heats and cools the building. as it gets lighter, shades can go up or down to make sure that you're not over using any kind of heat or air conditioning, but as it gets darker the shades can go back up. the lights inside the building self-adjust depending how close they are to the light sources outside, how light i
, no lack of clarity. this is a contract to shell energy to provide electricity. pure and simple. that is our objection. those are jobs. people want the work and we want control of that energy here in san francisco and in california as a whole. not out of state contracts to purchase electricity. the other two items we heard today again, there is no plan for a local build out. commissioner mentioned it, rate board members mentioned that. he said it just right because it's our concern as well, if this plan doesn't work and we are stuck with a contract with shell, that's work that my members do that no one else gets the do. that's our issue. and finally, again, using -- moving money around, creating, using a reserve fund as collateral which is what i heard to permit bondings capacity, it's not such a good idea from utility perspective but that funding amount doesn't occur until the end of the shell contract. that is our fundamental objective. you fore stall all the work all the good that can happen by signing the deal with shell. that's the issue. that's what people are saying, that
about the interest there is in the build out of renewable energy that this program that will lead to and years to come. i think we do have some differences about how quickly that build out can happen. we have a great interest of both public utilities commission and sflafco and that would lead to jobs and cleaner air for years to come. we'll have some discussion today about what our plan currently is and what it can be in the immediate future as well. we'll see the mic to our colleague. director of public utilities commission. any opening marks? >> none. i'm glad to be had been with my colleagues. >> great. that was item no. 3 and we can move on to next item no. 4. >> public comment members of the community -- on matters within the respective jurisdiction and not today's agenda. >> we'll have definitely opportunity to speak on agenda items as they come up today. this is about public comment. anyone would like to talk publically about any item not on the agenda is welcome to do so at this time. okay. seen none come forward we close general public comment and we are going to hear it
by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco whi
that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >>> while i get myself settled, maybe a show of hands. how many already been to see the exhibition? a number of you. first of all let me say good afternoon and first and foremost i would like to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who
because it cut the horses out of the equation. cable cars were a lot more energy efficient. they were very popular in cities all across the united states, including chicago. and they really took over in san francisco because cable cars could climb hills were horses couldn't, opening up development in parts of the city where before there hadn't been any. but cable cars had their drawbacks, too. a cablecar can only go nine miles an hour, as fast as the cable under the street pulling it. cables have a hard time pulling backwards, changing direction, investing in the infrastructure to put the cable in the street is very costly. so you have a lot of upfront costs. if a company wanted to run just one cable car, they had to start up the power house to get the cable car rung through the street. so it energy efficient issues as well. this is an interest street car. that was the new modern, exciting form of transportation. it was very energy efficient. each street car only used enough energy from the wires that it needed. it didn't have to run a power house. people were a little scared of them at fi
-maintained, lighting in the front, t.v. cameras. this kind of lighting is no longer allowed. the energy code says you have to have lighting that is high- efficacy, meaning lots of lumens per watt. you can't just screw bulbs in any longer. it may not be done. i want to mention, it's not just the front of your building, it's your yard, too. the preventative maintainence would say, get some hot nails or screws or something designed for exterior use and screw them on. fix it before it breaks is the goal. everybody has a shed. the code says you can have a shed as long as it's not over 100 square feet of projected roof area. >> california code says 120 square feet. san francisco says 100. fire escapes need lots of maintainence. this requires a fire escape person or contractor to test it, lube it, maintain it. you have to keep it painted and scrubbed. wire brush. this is one of those folding ladders, which we used to approve. we still approve other folding ladders. what do you have to do? >> if any of you have a ladder you are depending on for eggress, you don't want to wait until there is a fire. there is
that the rise and shine has more energy needs for more energy than they can produce themselves, and to maintain the economic growth which they believe is essential. we observed that the south china sea is a potential source of energy supplies for china and that there is a contention among the nations in that region as to where the ownership and rights of access are to the south china sea. and this is conceivable that china might seek to reestablish its claim there by military coercion and that could lead them into a confrontation with the united states' desire to maintain free access. the best way of avoiding that military conflict is what we should see because the military conflict with china would be catastrophic for both nations, indeed for the whole region. so, we want to avoid that. i believe the best way of avoiding that is by maintaining a -- continuing to maintain a strong naval presence in the region, and by having an unambiguous commitment to doing that. i believe that our new national security strategy is that unambiguous commitment, and i believe that the u.s. navy is capable of mai
that there is misinformation put out about the loss of jobs and energy created. that's confused a lot of people in san francisco. although the survey we'll see that was measured perhaps it wasn't a great number of people in san francisco. that information has been out there and it needs to be rebutted by communication staff within offices and puc. commissioner campos? >> i look forward to the information. i think the numbers we have here are pretty encouraging in terms of the numbers put out here, i think a lot of misinformation has been put out there and i think their strategy has been sort of let's throw everything up the wall strategy and see what sticks and you mentioned they mail, at times i do wonder who is doing more to kill this program whether it's p g and e and having to put out some of this information to be honest i think it's unfortunate. >> commissioner breed? >> i just want to go back to a point that commissioner torres brought up regarding the reduction of employment. i think clearly if there are a logs loss of customers for p g and e there will not be a need for as many employees if
that the real potential for preserving fuel and energy. i think the biggest example of this is the theatre. this could be reinforced earlier i see unattractive facade elements and as an architect i think of all the talented architects we have in this town and take that believe and adopt that believe into a very attractive residential tower. we're looking for affordable hourlgz and i think what a wonderful opportunity to take a building that has steel beams in place and foundations. every time we tear down buildings and replace buildings we're effective using new fossil fuel. so i'd like to encourage this commission a maybe promote the idea that there are many buildings in the city that are threatened to be torn down maybe we can use modifications to make them attractive and i'd like for the commission to look at energy issues in this way >> next speaker please. if you haven't spoken if i've called your name come on up >> morning commissioners i'm here to speak on behalf of the project for the mexican museum. i think you have a hardcopy of the information that our site gave you >> i'm so
. that means more than 40 percent of the chilean population. in terms of energy was released, you can see there it's one trillion kilograms of tnt, that means an 8.8 earthquake. another comparison could be 18,000 times the hiroshima atomic bomb. it's supposed it occur less than two a year above 8. chili has first runner up with 9.5 with bolivia, 10 minutes duration. this one was 8.8, at that moment was no. 4, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that things happen at night. i don't know why, but it always happen at night. so we are leading on february 27 at 3.24 and you can see in light blue the time when the first wave arrived the coast because the epicenter was so close to the coast. so it's no more than 10 minutes and at the same time the waves start moving through the pacific ocean and in 21 hours it hits the coast of hawaii. so everybody was affected because of that. in mexico, for instance, the variation of time was 1 1/2 meters. as you can see there, when that happened, 3.34, immediate
it will never happen -- when you do not have the energy anymore? that scared of a piece of blank paper and a collection coming up in six weeks -- that does not scare you? >> yes, but i tried to protect myself. for example, i go to a flea market, and nt place. when i see something that i find interesting, even if i have no interest in anything at the moment, i say that one day i will do something from that. i know that there was work on it. i think i have to burn it, because at the end, i take too much time to look at it. but, yes, i mean, to be honest, i think will realize what time that i have no more of the passion, which will mean i will stop. i think it is better. honestly, before i was doing that profession, because i was not at peace with the fact that i was rejected, so i was inventing a lot of things. at the moment, i started to work -- i finish. because i do the things that i'd love to do, why should i live now. there's no reason to lie? because i am accepted through my work? why should i lie? because i do not want to live again in my old days. but i will always interested in
environmental windows and save a lot of time and energy and money. it turns out it's in many cases more expensive because the cycle of replacing dual glazing, you have to pull this out and replace it again. the overall life cycle cost is quite high. dual glazing is getting better but we still see a lot of failures of seals in glazing. do you see that? here. looking up close you can see. that moisture in there is not going away. what do you have to do to fix this? >> take it out to reseal it. so take it out, either reseal it or replace -- yeah. here also along the same lines, dan mentioned that u.v. resistance issues, you know, sight in degrades a lot of material -- sunlight degrades a lot of materials. it's going to degrade caulking and paint and it's going to degrade the vinyl on the sides of windows and this is once again part of this dourability conundrum. how long is this environmental going to last that supports this new window? and what do we do to maintain that? i brought along some armor ol. it has a u.v. resistant compound in it. so i think as part of your home maintenance, if
and most of the energy that comes into san francisco is piped in from other places so we have to look at everything from a regional perspective. in terms of what we're doing with our infrastructure, we look at many risks to our systems to improve their reliability, both gas and electric. while we talk about earthquakes quite a bit, we look more at ground movement in general, whether it be earthquake related, land slide related, but in terms of our reliability all those risks are looked at and there's on-going efforts to increase the reliability of both the electric system and the gas system throughout the san francisco area and through the northern and system part of our state. we have hundreds of millions of dollars of pipeline replacement happening which is a major risk in a major earthquake. most people are aware in loma prieta the pipeline held pretty well but we are trying to build in a better manner to withdraw earthquakes. on the electric side, things are pretty well proat the timed already. things shut themselves off. depending on the magnitude of the earthquake, it could
, interior lighting and the energy use of the building and lead issues? >> well, we are study that right now. we are trying not to have increased usage of artificial light inside the building. we have a number of light sources including a natural light tube that brings like from the park level that is still there even with the metal scan. but to be obvious it's a technical question we are looking at now. the opacity is flexible. we may wind up with 50/50 percent proliferation. >> in terms of -- this is -- would be more open air than the glass configuration? >> it's a per fraetd skin. in both cases the skin is hanging out from the
to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ welcome, shall, to the uss macon islands. my name is lewis loeven and i'm the executive director of the san francisco fleet week association and what a great fleet week we're going to have for 2012. thank you. this is the second time we've had the uss macon islands and i want to thank captain pringle and his entire crew. what a great ship and what a great crew. they turned this swear hanger deck around all right night and turned it into a conference room and it looks absolutely beautiful. thank you, captain, and your entire crew. i'm going to make this short because we're already running a little bit behind schedule, but san francisco fleet week for the third year is organized with i ob
energy solutions, connie frank foundation, jinn ethic intel and mc castle foundation the stanley s foundation union bank, visa wells far go pg&e cummings west and rich and gudegee guggenheim. placegees web corp builders and the lunch is due to our in-kind media sponsors who we would like to also thank c cbs and one 07 a and one 06.9 f and suffrage business times. san francisco chronicle and san francisco gate.com and san francisco mag magazine and beach pointed babylon and thank you to awful you who support the foundation, the general and this event we look forward to seeing many of you this evening at hearts after dark. ladies and gentlemen ... with its elegant rotunda, the reflecting waters of the sub rounding lagoon and fraying rant eucalyptus trees, special dates and memorable proposals.
. keep? energy bars. dry food. canned vegetables. can corn, can peas, you can drain that and drink the water and eat the vegetables. buy can food that you eat normally. and a can opener. first aid kit, have 3. have you a small one in the car, have a nice sized one for home and make sure you have one at work. make sure if you are a diabetic or have a heart condition, something that you normal take have a little supply. have a storage area for this. consider this. if you have a supply kit, make sure you have one that's mobile. mobile meaning, if you have to evacuate a square mile for disaster or terrorist or anything, have it in there with you in case you are on your own for a bit. you might not be in your home. you might be somewhere else. there's a tsunami coming in. if you have kids at home what do you keep for them? make sure you keep them entertained and have food they like. the most useful tool in a disaster? scissors. if you use clothes you will be cold. [inaudible]. duct tape. many uses. you want garbage bags. line the toilet with trash bags. you want to line it, line it up
today, we call on all of us to turn our attention and our energy towards ending gun violence against our children. thank you. >> joining us on stage are mark and jackie barton. >> first thing that we would like to say is thank you. thank you to the tech community. for putting your time and effort and research into this. and we would like to thank ron and jim. as you said my name is mark barton and this is my wife jackie. we have three children. james is 12, natalie is eleven and daniel 7. three months ago today on december 14th, i held his little hand as we walked to the bus. i kissed him good-bye. for as you know, will be the last time. daniel as any parent will tell you that their child is special, but what was special about daniel is his kindness. he had a very unique compassionate part of his person. if you noticed the classmate sitting alone, he would ask the
this space with everybody. all of the beautiful courage that it takes to be up here. a lot of energy to the healing circle as well. as a juvenile, i was in juvenile hall and i went through that whole system myself. i have worked with tattoo removal, i went to other development programs. through personal experience and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and sayin
intellectually, i made up for in energy. i intervened on the basis that he was a child that had been subjected to incredible abuse. he was very much a kid and the child welfare system. it happens too many violent youth. i intervened, and he was never prosecuted. he was 14 years old, he was put into what would be thought of now has a psychiatric facility. it was a child psychiatric facility. he underwent all kinds of treatment, training, came out, went back to school. it really went through recovery. and then graduated high school, went to community college, and i would like someone to guess what profession he wound up going into. law enforcement. he was not with the lapd. he was with a smaller police department for 30 years. he has since retired. he has been married twice. he has raised four children. he has lived an extraordinary life. i am grateful for having had him in my life as a guidepost. i do think it is the ultimate irony that he turned out to be a police officer. >> we have some other questions. very good questions. we do not have much time. i work at san quentin prison. they segrega
of time and energy on things like social resolutions. how do you create a culture where people can report problems to each other? which i will talk about in a second, so cue up the next slide. >> dave, can i interrupt for a second? one of the things that i noticed they think is really important for people in the school space and probably law enforcement to remember is that social media platforms whatever it is and you name it -- what? a million apps for the mobile platform alone. those are not the context of bullying. school life, school, peer life, peer relations. that's the concept of bullying whether it's bullying or cyber bullying and this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an alternate reality or something separate or add on that the school and the
on art during the day. it provides a certain energy. when that moves on to the employees were working there during the night, coming in contact with patrons, you have a great start and a good experience. great talent, visuals, who have done the other thing for the most part. lots of responses. >> thank you. dmitri, while enhancing your out dope -- outdoor event, how important is the creative contact to make sure it you have customers who return over and over again? >> our creative content, you know, it is pretty out there. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be
, and people do if you're really trying to save some of your precious energy minutes, et cetera, or it's not working as well as it normally does, it is helpful to have a message board that you can get information to other people. and, so, that's what we're showing here. you can see people are going to be looking for their pets. they're going to be looking for rides. people are going to need to be sharing resources a much as they possibly can. another thing that you can see here is they're going to need to be fair tools and some of the things that people are going to need in order to be able to stay safer within their homes. so, we're just showing sort of a gesture to that with all these different tools here. but then also tarps, people are going to need to cover their windows if their windows are cracked, if their roofs are broken. so, ideally, the city would be able to know where all these neighborhood centers are and help deliver some of these supplies. >> they could come from a neighbor, maybe not. thank you so much for allowing us to come in and share this wonderful exhibit. and th
energy to really fill in all the gaps. what makes me the saddest is when diag, and i and police chief suhr get the texts on the mornings where we see a victim of crime. and what i usually do is put a face on that. and i get characteristics. young black male. hispanic male. victim, 2 a.m. gunshot wound, sf general, did not survive. and i try to put my own face on that, which is the kids that i see that we try to graduate up. or middle school kids that i would have seen. what could i have done for them. whether some counseling or guidance. or some support to the family. and we can be very creative in this effort. we can show the country by coming together we can do things throughout the whole continuum to provide that support. and we know we have the answers. because oftentimes we have seen those circumstances where we did bring out a troubled family out of a bad environment. but we put them some place and then two weeks later that individual will go back to where they were. and get into a situation. so we know that it isn't just the physical environment we have to change. it's also the
energy in pride and taking pride in the work and express that go pride is what's happening this year so it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping wh
focus ourn our energies now. you have to focus your services and get obviously the return. that's where the services have been. there has been a tremendous advantage in the last 5 years. everyday our office is changing. i fully expect that as this is happening now, our case managers, the challenge for our case managers, they are going to have to adapt to look at these practices in the same way. but you can't substitute great case manager and social services and that's really how it wraps into what we do. >> before i get to miss dewint, i want to give professor simon a chance to say a few words. i'm wondering professor if you can context lies this discussion historically and whether or not there has ever been a large or successful movement in this state towards the elimination of money bail? >> now you are
detail, the energy and time that the young people committed to make sure we created of the awareness of human trafficking. i want to highlight that there is a calendar of events. if any of you would like to continue to be involved i encourage you to either yourself be involved or pass out the information. today there will be a human trafficking 101 session that we encourage you to attend so we understand thisu
. it is offgassing and reflecting all the energy. >> in the middle, we are waiting to see if the fire spreads. it is spreading from the one end down. >> the second one has the same material for exposure. it is comparing two buildings with the same protection, against two buildings with the same protection for the main fire building, one for exposure and next to it. the second one is catching. >> we have environmental factors effecting this. we have wind blowing in a certain direction. the exposure on the one next to it not really any heat. this is a good demonstration. >> the interesting deal right off the bat is that one burned down and this one -- >> has yet to ignite. >> i see spoke. >> just the products inside that are burning. >> wow. very exciting. >> so i can imagine -- i'm with the building department, there are real implication for providing fire resistive safety in buildings if we can figure out how to properly apply it and make sure people don't cut holes in it. >> there are fire service and dynamics that go there. the building industry and manufacturers love the late weigh
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)